RottenBrains

… brains …

iRobot Looj First Mission

I just completed my first use of the iRobot Looj™125. The bottom line is, it was better than I expected.

When iRobot first announced the Looj, my reaction was along the line of “what were they thinking?” I couldn’t imagine that there was enough market in home gutter cleaning robots to warrant the R&D cost. But then we had new landscaping installed, and found a section being damaged by water overflowing the corner of one of our gutters. Candace said she’d fix that section of the flower bed, but not until I cleaned the gutters.

The Looj had reached its second generation by then, and they’re not that expensive, so I ordered one. Due to too many hands on my time, I only managed to deploy it this weekend.

Guess what? It works pretty well. It was not perfect, but it sure beat having to move the ladder every few feet. It plowed through the real debris with gusto. It was great for tree matter, etc. It was not quite as good with the several years build up of fine silt–it got most of that but left quite a bit behind.

This model is rated for 150 linear feet of gutter. I didn’t measure my gutters, but it handled the whole house on one charge. Now, it’s not a big house, and most of the gutters on the south side were mysteriously clean.

The unit had plenty of power. It would occasionally hang on something and flip itself over–but this model can run just fine upside-down. The only significant downside was that a lot of the spacer rods in my gutters were angled down too far, and blocked the Looj from its duties. I don’t blame the Looj for this; it was typically shoddy work on the builder’s part. On the other hand, if the Looj was made a little thinner, it would have fit under most of them.

Some other minor issues:

I don’t think the handle-remote was the best idea. It becomes difficult to remove and reinstall once the unit gets dust and grime on the handle rails. This is complicated by the need to hold onto the ladder while messing with it. The battery cover on the remote comes off too easily–I had to climb down the ladder to find my batteries more than once.

It sprays dirt all over the place–but I don’t see much way around that short of a built in shop-vac. You will need eye protection and a hat with a brim.

The NiCad battery needs too much babying–I thought we were past the days of having to pull the battery off the charger to avoid overcharging, and having to guess when the battery was fully charged instead of having an indicator.

But overall, it was a clear win over doing it by hand. I’m still not sure about the market for home gutter-cleaning robots, as I imagine I would use it once a year at the most. But I expect a single visit from a professional gutter cleaner would cost me more than the entire unit.

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