Archives for Tech

Apple’s iMessage encryption trips up feds’ surveillance | Politics and Law – CNET News

Categories: Crypto, IM, iPhone, Politics and Local Topics, and Rants and Rambling.

The DEA has figured out that getting a wiretap order for an iPhone, executed at the phone company, doesn’t get them iMessage content. It’s pretty obvious the various TLAs engaged in law enforcement will use this as a concrete example to push the “Going Dark” initiative to get CALEA reinterpreted (or legislated) to cover various internet based communication services. And designing a service to use end-to-end protection will be right out.

iMessage is a special case here, since it inserts itself into the normal text message user interface. It’s the phone’s preferred way to send messages, and from the user’s (and law enforcement’s) perspective, it’s a native feature of the phone rather than an app.

I’m worried this will bring up yet another concern–even if they get what they want with CALEA, they are going to discover that they have execute multiple, maybe even many, wire tap orders to track a single subject. How long until we require each ISP to be able to MiTM attach every TLS connection? Or another clipper chip initiative?

Apple’s iMessage encryption trips up feds’ surveillance | Politics and Law – CNET News

(Via MacRumors.)

Political Fallout

Categories: Dear God, Make It Stop!, Politics and Local Topics, Rants and Rambling, and Tech.

It’s started. We knew it would.

Japan current nuclear plant problem is real. I don’t want to take anything away from that.

But the anti-nuclear rhetoric is already starting. This big scary nuke plants must be a danger to us all. And I freely admit, there are dangers involved. The only rational response I can think of, is a quote from Wikipedia:

Comparing the historical safety record of civilian nuclear energy with other forms of electrical generation, Ball, Roberts, and Simpson, the IAEA, and the Paul Scherrer Institute found in separate studies that during the period from 1970 to 1992, there were just 39 on-the-job deaths of nuclear power plant workers worldwide, while during the same time period, there were 6,400 on-the-job deaths of coal power plant workers, 1,200 on-the-job deaths of natural gas power plant workers and members of the general public caused by natural gas power plants, and 4,000 deaths of members of the general public caused by hydroelectric power plants.In particular, coal power plants are estimated to kill 24,000 Americans per year, due to lung disease as well as causing 40,000 heart attacks per year in the United States. According to Scientific American, the average coal power plant emits more than 100 times as much radiation per year than a comparatively sized nuclear power plant in the form of toxic coal waste known as fly ash.

Now, don’t think for a minute that I believe nuclear plants are a good idea. No centralized, high-capital approach to energy is a good idea. But since we seem to be limited to centralized, high-capital approaches, nuclear power is about the best option we’ve got.

Here’s to hoping Japan can solve this problem with the least possible damage to life and property. And to hoping we can learn the lessons needed to make this sort of thing safer in the future. But any discussion about the risks of nuclear power must consider the relative risks of just about every other energy source we currently have.

iRobot Looj First Mission

Categories: Tech and Toys.

I just completed my first use of the iRobot Looj™125. The bottom line is, it was better than I expected.

When iRobot first announced the Looj, my reaction was along the line of “what were they thinking?” I couldn’t imagine that there was enough market in home gutter cleaning robots to warrant the R&D cost. But then we had new landscaping installed, and found a section being damaged by water overflowing the corner of one of our gutters. Candace said she’d fix that section of the flower bed, but not until I cleaned the gutters.

The Looj had reached its second generation by then, and they’re not that expensive, so I ordered one. Due to too many hands on my time, I only managed to deploy it this weekend.

Guess what? It works pretty well. It was not perfect, but it sure beat having to move the ladder every few feet. It plowed through the real debris with gusto. It was great for tree matter, etc. It was not quite as good with the several years build up of fine silt–it got most of that but left quite a bit behind.

This model is rated for 150 linear feet of gutter. I didn’t measure my gutters, but it handled the whole house on one charge. Now, it’s not a big house, and most of the gutters on the south side were mysteriously clean.

The unit had plenty of power. It would occasionally hang on something and flip itself over–but this model can run just fine upside-down. The only significant downside was that a lot of the spacer rods in my gutters were angled down too far, and blocked the Looj from its duties. I don’t blame the Looj for this; it was typically shoddy work on the builder’s part. On the other hand, if the Looj was made a little thinner, it would have fit under most of them.

Some other minor issues:

I don’t think the handle-remote was the best idea. It becomes difficult to remove and reinstall once the unit gets dust and grime on the handle rails. This is complicated by the need to hold onto the ladder while messing with it. The battery cover on the remote comes off too easily–I had to climb down the ladder to find my batteries more than once.

It sprays dirt all over the place–but I don’t see much way around that short of a built in shop-vac. You will need eye protection and a hat with a brim.

The NiCad battery needs too much babying–I thought we were past the days of having to pull the battery off the charger to avoid overcharging, and having to guess when the battery was fully charged instead of having an indicator.

But overall, it was a clear win over doing it by hand. I’m still not sure about the market for home gutter-cleaning robots, as I imagine I would use it once a year at the most. But I expect a single visit from a professional gutter cleaner would cost me more than the entire unit.

Get ‘Em While They’re Hot

Categories: Eco-nerd, Tech, and Toys.

Tesla Motors is now taking deposits for their über-cool Model S sedan, which is planned for production in 2011 — they’ll be sold off in first-come-first-served order. The claims are 0-60 mph in a smooth 5.6 seconds, with seating for 5 adults. And 300 miles on a charge. Base models start at $50,000 — which seems quite the bargain, when you consider that it’s likely to compete with luxury sedans for amenities.

For a mere $5,000 ($4,950 of which can be refunded, at least as long as Tesla remains solvent), you can get your place in line.

Gig-E, Screen Sharing, and Screen Sharing (Don’t try this at home)

Categories: Entertainment, OS X, Silly Stuff, and Tech.

Recursive Screen Sharingrecursive

(After a minute or so, the switch turned off the port connected to the laptop…)

Addendum: Today (22Dec), Byron, Phil, and I attempted VNC-doom: 3 laptops, 1 gigabit-ethernet switch, and an attempt at a full 3-way mesh of screen sharing.

We found bugs. Lots of annoying little bugs. The most entertaining/frustrating version was inducing one-way visibility in the clients. So we didn’t get the full-mesh going today, but we got some really pretty pictures from having two loops running at once. Maybe after a round or two of bug fixing (if reports have any effect), we’ll give it another shot.

But I think next time, we’ll need 5 laptops in a mesh. Not only do you get a nice layout on the client screens (one peer in each corner), you end up with a pentagram for a diagram as a bonus :).